Faith. Family. Fastballs.

Journalist Bobby Ross Jr.'s bylines from all 50 states and 12 nations » Plus: my baseball blog » Contact: therossnews@gmail.com

Top stories

With a focus on faith and values, I report on major news across the United States — and around the world.

From presidential politics to pedophile preachers, from race relations to refugees, from tornadoes to terrorist attacks, I cover important stories that matter. And human interest features, too.

Scroll down to read my top stories for The Christian Chronicle, The Associated Press, The Oklahoman and other major media — from Religion News Service to The Washington Post.

— Bobby

Above photo: Interviewing a Syrian refugee family in Canada.

• • •

2017

• Syrian refugees find ‘second family’ in Canadian churches (reporting from St. Catharines, Ontario): Toronto-area Christians welcomed Muslim strangers — and “gained so much in the process.”

In rural Canada, churches that once shunned one another open their hearts to Syrian refugees (reporting from Dauphin, Manitoba): “The focus was very much on helping our neighbors in need,” one leader says.

• Build the wall? Bar refugees?: Christians debate President Trump’s immigration orders. With related story and profile of refugee advocate (reporting from Houston).

A baptism, then a murder confession (reporting from Gatesville, Texas): Texas woman gave her life to Christ, owned up to a slaying — and got a life sentence.

• For thousands of Nicaragua’s poor, mission ‘a gift from God’ (reporting from Jinotega, Nicaragua): Outreach that started with a small medical clinic has grown to meet needs ranging from education to water systems. With related column from Panama City.

•  For kings and queens with special needs, a Night to Shine (reporting from Fort Smith, Ark.): Arkansas church rolls out the red carpet at prom-like event.

Faith helped baseball coach Tony Beasley beat cancer (reporting from Arlington, Texas): Texas Rangers’ ‘inspiration’ sings the national anthem on Opening Day.

• • •

• • •

2016

In the GOP primaries, do politics Trump values and character? (reporting from Oklahoma City): Republican frontrunner’s personal background is an issue for some but not all. With related story Elephant in the pews and column GOP presidential politics, professional wrestling style.

 Thirsty souls: Churches help victims of Flint water crisis (reporting from Flint, Mich.): With residents angry and frustrated over lead contamination, Christians work to meet physical and spiritual needs.

Orlando massacre: a Christian response (reporting from Orlando, Fla.): Part 1: “Loving gays and lesbians.” Part 2: “Jihad and ordinary Muslims.” Part 3: “A special connection to a victim’s family.”

In this Bible Belt state, Democrats call hot-button issues a ‘smokescreen’ (reporting from Oklahoma City). Even some Republicans in GOP-run Oklahoma say that abortion and transgender bills are a distraction.

Canadian churches embrace Syrian refugees (reporting from Beamsville, Ontario): Two congregations adopt a family displaced by a civil war that has claimed half a million lives.

After a deadly week, a somber Sunday (reporting from Dallas): Christians look to God for comfort and guidance after a sniper kills five police officers. With sidebar.

• He pitches with heart — a brand new one (reporting from Goddard, Kan.): Kansas high school senior calls life-saving transplant “an absolute gift from God.”

God in the rubble (reporting from Rowlett, Texas): “This world is not our home,” says family that lost house in Texas twister. With related profile of victim and personal column.

Another devoted teenage reader. (Or something like that.)

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• Young man with autism has a heart for homeless (reporting from Camarillo, Calif.): California church member overcomes fears as he leads ministry that serves the needy.

• Amid massive biker rally, Bible camp thrives (reporting from Deadwood, S.D.): Deep in the Black Hills National Forest, Christians from the Dakotas and beyond renew ties and enjoy fellowship.

• • •

2015

The broken soul of Baltimore (reporting from Baltimore): After the rioting, church leaders seek to bring spiritual and social renewal to the city. With related profile of minister.

• Oklahoma State leans on faith after another tragedy (reporting from Stillwater, Okla.): Four people die and dozens are injured when a car crashes into homecoming parade crowd. With related narrative feature.

• Massacre puts focus on Muslims (reporting from San Bernardino, Calif.): Jihadist theology vs. mainstream Islam debated.

• From daughter to caretaker (reporting from Sylacauga, Ala.): Role reversal draws one woman closer to her parents — and to God. With sidebar.

• Forgiving a racist chant (reporting from Oklahoma City): Amid national outrage over a video referencing the N-word and lynchings, a Christian senator seeks to bring healing.

• A church for the broken and hurting (reporting from Fort Worth, Texas): In urban Fort Worth, a 123-year-old congregation enjoys a spiritual revival as it ministers to wounded souls. 

 The long road from Baghdad (reporting from Dearborn, Mich.): Wissam Al-Aethawi endeavors to take the Gospel to the epicenter of Arab life in America. 

• Why a Georgia church elder is making news at U.S. Supreme Court (reporting from Rome, Ga.): In a death-row murder case, all the potential black jurors — including Eddie Hood — were excluded. 

• Why Detroit Tigers pitcher Daniel Norris was baptized in his baseball uniform (reporting from Detroit): One of the major leagues’ top young prospects, Norris seeks to give all the glory to God. With related column.

• ‘God allowed us to make it through’ (reporting from New Orleans): At the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, survivors keep counting their blessings. With related column.

EXTRA — We Will Never Forget: At the 20th anniversary, reflecting on my seven most memorable stories on the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

• • •

2014

• ‘Worship is our protest’ (reporting from Ferguson, Mo.): In Ferguson, a predominantly black church focuses on healing its community by glorifying God. With sidebar.

• Inside the ‘Duck Dynasty’ church (reporting from West Monroe, La.): For home congregation, Robertson family’s celebrity a blessing and a challenge. With related column and story.

• His dad was a preacher — and a pedophile (reporting from Somerset, Pa.): After discovering his father’s secret, Jimmy Hinton strives to create awareness of sexual predators.

 Under a bridge, come to the feast (reporting from Tulsa, Okla.): Night Light Tulsa shows love for the homeless by preparing meals, washing feet and praying.

Cristo can move mountains, Spanish-speaking church believes (reporting from Elgin, Ill.): Part of the “One Nación Under God” special project. 

Stripping away the stigma (reporting from Colleyville, Texas): Ministries help women escape sex industry. Related stories on Christians fighting sex trafficking and a former sex slave.

50 years of Northern exposure (reporting from Wasilla, Alaska): Alaska annual meeting celebrates a half-century of promoting unity among Christians in the Last Frontier.

• In Kentucky, a dispute over church, state and taxpayer-funded foster care (reporting from Melber, Ky.): Rather than adhere to proselytization rules, a Christian children’s home gives up its seven-figure state funding.

• • •

2013

• How the ‘faith-based FEMA’ are helping Moore move on (reporting from Moore, Okla.): As President Obama pledges recovery, Christian volunteers aid Oklahoma tornado victims based on what each denomination does best. With related column.

• Iowa church refuses to die (reporting from Montezuma, Iowa): 156-year-old congregation epitomizes the challenges faced by many small, rural Churches of Christ. With related story from Beallsville, Ohio.

• Mandela legacy in South Africa: All races worship freely: Anti-apartheid champion’s quest for equality and justice draws praise from leaders of Churches of Christ. With related blog post.

• Social justice vs. kingdom work (reporting from Colorado Springs, Colo.): Can Christians do good without sharing Jesus? With sidebar from Denver.

• Financial crisis strikes Southwestern Christian College (reporting from Terrell, Texas): Historically black Christian college seeks donations and prayers to “be able to survive.”

• In Guatemala, a celebration 50 years in the making (reporting from Guatemala City): The Pan American Lectureship returns to the Central American capital where it started in 1963.

• Fertilizer plant explosion rocks Texas church (reporting from West, Texas): After a deadly blast at a plant owned by a church elder, West Church of Christ members rely on faith, prayer and fellow Christians.

• • •

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Photo by Bobby Ross Jr.: Church of Christ minister Bobby Lawson prays at a vigil at a federal deportation center west of Chicago. 

• • •

2012

Illegal immigration pits law vs. mercy (reporting from Chicago): One minister’s passion for aliens.

Black, white and Gray (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.): Civil rights attorney who once challenged Lipscomb University in court receives the Christian university’s highest honor. 

A rocky road for Mexico missions (reporting from Aquiles, Mexico): Amid violence south of the U.S. border, many churches rethink travel plans. But safety concerns fail to deter some. 

• Faith, family and ducks: Behind the scenes of ‘Duck Dynasty’ (reporting from West Monroe, La.): For these reality TV stars, “holding Hollywood’s hand” presents a challenge as they endeavor to share Jesus. 

• From Rhode Island to Liberia, with love (reporting from Providence, R.I.): Immigrant church in the United States has big dreams for bringing hope and healing to its war-torn homeland. 

Pass the syrup, but religion gets sticky (reporting from Springfield, Vt.): Faithful persevere in secular Vermont. With sidebars on red state vs. blue state voting and one church’s vote for Jesus.

• Boston Movement growing again after crisis (reporting from San Antonio): A decade after “the roof caved in,” the International Churches of Christ change their leadership structure and discipling approach. 

• • •

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Photo by Jennifer Glidden: Dorwan and Mavy Stoddard hold hands at a Mountain Avenue Church of Christ event in Tucson, Ariz. 

• • •

2011

• ‘He was a hero to his church family’ (reporting from Tucson, Ariz.): Member killed, wife wounded when gunman opens fire on Arizona congresswoman. With related column.

• The war at home (reporting from Camp Lejeune, N.C.): 10 years later, the legacy of Sept. 11.

Healing a wounded town (reporting from Alsea, Ore.): After a string of suicides, a minister helps bring answers to a small Oregon community. 

Sex, money … pride?: Why pastors are stepping down might surprise you.

Big storms, bigger hearts (reporting from Joplin, Mo.): Christians reach out to help after killer tornadoes. With sidebar.

Ministry in Mormon country (reporting from Salt Lake City): For Churches of Christ in Utah, reaching a state dominated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints poses an immense challenge. 

Saving Sin City (reporting from Las Vegas): Meeting draws preachers, leaders to Las Vegas.

• • •

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Photo by Bobby Ross Jr.: Tim M., an inmate at Limestone Correctional Facility in Harvest, Ala., is described as a dynamic soul winner.

• • •

2010

• Faith behind bars (reporting from Harvest, Ala.): Ministries shine light inside prison walls.

Five years later, Katrina’s spiritual toll lingers (reporting from Mandeville, La.): Beyond physical losses, hurricane’s path of debris left some New Orleans-area churches facing unexpected challenges. With related column from Gulfport, Miss.

Faith-based fracas:From the White House to the courthouse, the battle escalates over whether Christian groups have the right to employ only Christians.

Christian education in hard times (reporting from Newark, Del.): Facing financial woes, more schools closing.

To recruit, Christian colleges casting wider nets (reporting from York, Neb.): Institutions drawing more students from outside Churches of Christ. With related story.

More precious than gold (reporting from Vancouver, British Columbia): This Canadian city will retain its international flavor long after the Winter Olympics end, as members of Churches of Christ can attest.

The Rookie,’ Part 2 (reporting from Abilene, Texas): Life of former major-leaguer Jim Morris takes more extraordinary turns.

• • •

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Photo by Bobby Ross Jr.: Teenagers listen during the Southern Africa Bible College Lectureship in Benoni, east of Johannesburg. 

• • •

2009

Post-apartheid era brings blessings (reporting from Benoni, South Africa): New signs of racial harmony can be seen among Churches of Christ in Nelson Mandela’s “Rainbow Nation.”

Prosperity Gospel on Skid Row: Difficulties of high-profile pastors may reorient movement — or reinforce it.

Death among homeless inspires soul-searching (reporting from Edmond, Okla.): Churches across the nation grapple with problem.

Saying goodbye to Cascade (reporting from Portland, Ore.): In the Pacific Northwest, a small Christian college closes amid a mix of tears and laughter.

Little church on the prairie (reporting from Gravelbourg, Saskatchewan): In a historically French Catholic prairie town, a 100-member Church of Christ thrives.

Special needs, special children (reporting from Raleigh, N.C.): Ministry shows love, shares Jesus.

Training Africa’s next generation (reporting from Accra, Ghana): In Ghana, dream for Christian college materializes.

• • •

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Photo by Bobby Ross Jr.: Participants at the Unity Events for Christ in Southfield, Mich., visit at the conclusion of Sunday afternoon’s worship.

• • •

2008

Race and the church: Getting beyond the handshake (reporting from Southfield, Mich.): In a city split by racial wounds, Detroit-area church leaders endeavor to promote reconciliation, cooperation through regular fellowship, joint ministry. 

New England’s place of refuge, fellowship (reporting from Raymond, Maine): Like many Christian camps nationwide, Gander Brook nurtures young people, brings together the faithful in its region. 

Presidential race engages students: Youthful Obama creates buzz of excitement for some, while Palin’s selection as vice-presidential candidate energizes others.

Faith and politics: Members in all 50 states weigh in on presidential election in Christian Chronicle survey.

Teens eager to show faith by serving (reporting from Mitchell, Ind.): Indiana youth group epitomizes spirt of action seen across the nation.

Immigration and the church (reporting from New York): Manhattan church reflects melting pot nature of New York City.

Drugs or Jesus? (reporting from Atlanta): Addicts find hope, healing through recovery ministry. 

• • •

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Photo by Bobby Ross Jr.: Campus minister Seth Terrell, right, pauses at a memorial for the Virginia Tech massacre victims. 

• • •

2007

Virginia Tech massacre challenges campus minister (reporting from Blacksburg, Va.): After the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, Seth Terrell faces the biggest ministry challenge of his young career.

Education as an outreach tool? (reporting from Pottstown, Pa.): Christian school hallways dotted with Baptists, Methodists, Catholics, Lutherans and even Muslims, Hindus and Jews. 

Rich in spirit, poor in funds for retirement: A sociologist’s study cites low pay, little savings and church-owned homes as factors contributing to ministers’ bleak financial outlooks.

Lift every voice and sing (reporting from Malibu, Calif.): The Ascending Voice, an international symposium of sacred a cappella music, draws hundreds of scholars, theologians, musicologists and singers to Pepperdine University.

For congressman, faith provides a foundation (reporting from Washington): The only U.S. congressman who lists his religious affiliation as Church of Christ is a staunch Texas conservative.

Population outpaces church: The U.S. population is growing. And fast. The nation’s 13,000 Churches of Christ are not. In a nutshell, that’s the challenge facing the fellowship, a Christian Chronicle study finds. First in a series.

Rural revival (reporting from Newport, Ark.): Once-dying Arkansas congregation discovers new life.

• • •

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Photo by Bobby Ross Jr.: Charles and Angela Marsalis pose in the balcony of the Carrollton Avenue Church of Christ, where they fled as floodwaters rose after Hurricane Katrina. 

• • •

2006

Surviving the storm (reporting from New Orleans): As Hurricane Katrina roars toward New Orleans, Charles and Angela Marsalis seek refuge at their church. Over the next week, they’ll endure a nightmare that will test their faith. 

Minister’s slaying, wife’s arrest deal double tragedy (reporting from Selmer, Tenn.): Under the glare of intense national media spotlight, small-town Tennessee church mourns preacher’s death and offers forgiveness to his jailed widow. 

At 100-year anniversary of split, ministers exchange Bibles at convention (reporting from Louisville, Ky.): After a century of division, some leaders focus on fostering better relations between instrumental and a cappella churches.

Churches in living rooms, coffee shops a growing trend (reporting from New York): It’s a movement that a leading pollster suggests could change the face of American religion.

Marriage group with church ties hit with lawsuit: Bush administration accused of violating the separation of church and state by funding a marriage enrichment organization associated with Churches of Christ. With related story.

Courage under fire (reporting from Clinton, Mo.): Church member from Missouri — a 22-year-old Army infantryman — relies on his faith and his family after losing both legs in his second tour of duty in Iraq.

A minister’s escape from sexual addiction: Like a cocaine addict in need of a fix, he’d close his church office door and drown himself in a sea of pornographic Web sites. 

• • •

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Photo provided by Fred Gray: Longtime civil rights attorney and church elder Fred Gray talks with Rosa Parks, his friend and famous client. 

• • •

2005

Faithful offer hope, help after Katrina (reporting from Mandeville, La.): A disaster that killed hundreds and left thousands homeless presents one congregation with an extraordinary opportunity.

After Katrina, Yelton again in the eye of the storm (reporting from Gulfport, Miss.): No electricity. No phone service. No church leaders waiting to greet him at the airport. None of those obstacles could stop this veteran disaster relief volunteer.

• No lights, but plenty of blessings (reporting from Jasper, Texas): Texas church deals with aftermath of Hurricane Rita.

Rosa Parks ‘changed America’: Her lawyer, Fred Gray, reflects on the “mother of the Civil Rights Movement” after her death at age 92.

In Kansas, a battle over the origin of the world (reporting from Arkansas City, Kan.): State school board chairman defends his faith and attacks evolution “dogma.”

Reporter shines light on state’s dark past (reporting from Jackson, Miss.): Church of Christ member Jerry Mitchell’s “dogged investigation of the sins of the past” brings Ku Klux Klan members to justice.

‘Lord Byron’ (reporting from Roanoke, Texas): At 93, golf legend Byron Nelson still faithful to God and the church.

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• • •

2002-2005

• • •

Presidential campaign 

President Bush caps final day of 2004 campaign with Dallas rally (reporting from Dallas)

Crawford, Texas, rallies behind President Bush after hometown paper endorses John Kerry (reporting from Crawford, Texas)

People of faith ask: How would Jesus vote in 2004 presidential election? (reporting from Austin, Texas)

Dallas visit offers Bush chance to appeal to Catholics (reporting from Dallas)

AP exclusive: Son of late officer and others question Bush memos attributed to his dad (reporting from Dallas)

Former Texas House speaker says he’s ‘ashamed’ for helping Bush get into National Guard (reporting from Dallas)

AP enterprise: A rarity in Bush country: Voters split on presidential race (reporting from Daingerfield, Texas)

Texans fight for popular votes in Bush’s home state (reporting from Plano, Texas)

Religion

AP enterprise: American boy and his church share faith, friendship with Mexican orphans (reporting from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico)

AP enterprise: Children of Holocaust survivors find each other, and find answers (reporting from Southlake, Texas)

AP enterprise: 25 years later, passions still strong on Southern Baptists’ conservative takeover (reporting from Houston)

AP enterprise: Payout in Lutheran abuse case totals $69 million (reporting from Marshall, Texas)

AP enterprise: Megachurches put on megaproductions for the Christmas story (reporting from Plano, Texas)

Opening of Mel Gibson’s ‘Passion’ movie draws crowds across the nation (reporting from Plano, Texas)

Texas priest ‘unlikely leader’ in Episcopal conservatives’ fight against gay bishop (reporting from Plano, Texas)

From TV sermons to book, pastor Joel Osteen’s influence grows with flock (reporting from Houston)

AP enterprise: For Texas couple, caring for Sudanese ‘heart kid’ life-changing (reporting from Lubbock, Texas)

San Antonio archbishop steps into role as leading Hispanic cleric in the United States (reporting from San Antonio)

‘SoupMan’ offers food and hope to the homeless in Dallas (reporting from Dallas)

No doughnuts on Sunday? Churches confront nutrition, fitness (reporting from Grapevine, Texas)

During Gospel Music Week, Christian music reigns in Nashville bars, nightspots (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Excommunicated Jehovah’s Witnesses speak out on church’s handling of child abuse victims (reporting from Tullahoma, Tenn.)

Breaking news

AP exclusive: Condemned Tennessee inmate says government, military control his mind (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

AP enterprise: 5-year-old’s torture, beating death brings questions (reporting from Chattanooga, Tenn.)

Police: Shooting deaths of four, including two high school football players, not random (reporting from McKinney, Texas)

Texas town prepares for long day of funerals after eight senior citizens killed in church bus crash (reporting from Eldorado, Texas)

Iraq war

Reaction as U.S. launches strike on Iraq shows nation still divided on war (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Iraq war opponents hold rallies across Tennessee (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Fallen Marine — first Tennessean killed in Iraq war — ‘laid down his life for his friend’ (reporting from Gallatin, Tenn.)

AP enterprise: Patriotism, sense of duty bind WWII veteran, son killed in Iraq (reporting from Corpus Christi, Texas)

AP exclusive: Woman who lost father in Iraq loses husband, too (reporting from Dallas)

Christian groups eager to help in Iraq, but critics wary their aim is conversion (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

JFK assassination

• Kennedy assassination still stirs memories, debate 40 years later (reporting from Dallas)

• Historians see similarities, differences in Kennedy, Bush (reporting from Dallas)

• Experts: Presidency more difficult after Kennedy (reporting from Dallas)

Politics

• Some dare to ask: Does Texas need an income tax? (reporting from Dallas)

 Sin taxes: Political genius or unstable way to fund schools? (reporting from Dallas)

• Future president? Three Tennessee politicians play prominent national roles (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

• Donning camouflage, scoping out doves, Senate candidates campaign with guns blazing (reporting from Kingston Springs, Tenn.)

Tennessee lottery

Lottery advocates, foes debate impact on education (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Tennessee lottery supporters look to Georgia as model (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Moral issue or not? Tennessee voters to decide whether to legalize state lottery (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Victorious Tennessee lottery backers ponder next step (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Tennessee hoping to soon keep lottery dollars at home (reporting from Franklin, Ky.)

Dub it Lottery 101: Tennessee officials seek tips on lottery startup (reporting from Atlanta)

On Georgia bus trip, Tennessee lawmakers discover the business of a lottery (reporting from Atlanta)

Business

• AP enterprise: Click and buy: Internet becomes hot place for used car sales (reporting from Arlington, Texas)

• AP exclusive: Forgotten stock account helps Tennessee man reunite homeless woman, family (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Child Protective Services

AP enterprise: Funding a key issue in Texas’ child protection crisis (reporting from Austin, Texas)

AP enterprise: Keeping children safe is a fast-paced, high-stress job (reporting from San Antonio)

Education

AP enterprise: Schools learning new four-letter word: Mold blamed for illnesses, lawsuits and millions in maintenance (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Sept. 11 anniversary

AP enterprise: Post-attack volunteerism: Lasting trend or a blip? (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Tennesseans transformed by terrorist attacks (reporting from Nashville, Tenn.)

Small-town Tennessee volunteers help ‘fellow man’ after New York attacks (reporting from Smyrna, Tenn.)

Sports

Amid basketball scandal, Baylor tries to return to normalcy (reporting from Waco, Texas)

Dennehy case reopens wounds for Baylor basketball program (reporting from Waco, Texas)

AP exclusive: Car dealer says Baylor coach helped missing player find SUV (reporting from West, Texas)

Player’s disappearance another blow for nation’s largest Baptist university (reporting from Waco, Texas)

After 25 seasons, life as Texas Rangers baseball announcer still thrills Eric Nadel (reporting from Arlington, Texas)

In fight over proposed Cowboys stadium, some ask: Where’s Jerry? (reporting from Arlington, Texas)

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2002

Marriage and divorce in Oklahoma: In-depth series on Gov. Frank Keating’s taxpayer-funded initiative targeting the state’s No. 2-in-the-nation divorce rate.

Archbishop sees failure in abuse case: Evaluation of Duncan priest sought in 1994, he acknowledges in interview with The Oklahoman. Earlier story.

U.S. bishops ask Keating to lead board (reporting from Dallas): Governor to oversee panel on clergy sexual abuse.

Gay rights group protests during Southern Baptist Convention (reporting from St. Louis): A dozen Soulforce members arrested as SBC president declares the denomination will not compromise.

2001

Four spot news stories from Sept. 11, 2001: 1. National tragedy bitter reminder for Oklahoma City bombing victims. 2. City’s Muslims fear backlash of blame. 3. Faithful gather for prayer, support across Oklahoma. 4. Oklahoma professor’s daughter witnesses attack, describes scene.

First woman executed since statehood (reporting from McAlester, Okla.): Two-time killer Wanda Jean Allen dies by lethal injection, despite protests by Jesse Jackson and death penalty opponents.

Parole rates soaring (reporting from Lexington, Okla.): New members, changed attitudes alter pattern of recommendations, a review by The Oklahoman finds.

Washed in the blood: Trooper paralyzed by shooting finds new hope.

2000

Execution day starts early, lasts 18 hours (reporting from McAlester, Okla.): Behind the scenes of capital punishment in Oklahoma.

Inmates obtain dignity in death (reporting from McAlester, Okla.): Cemetery is final resting place for orphaned prisoners.

Killer given hope:In precedent-setting case, state to consider clemency for inmate serving “life without parole,” The Oklahoman learns. Related story.Final decision.

Arbuckle wildfire leaves ruins (reporting from Davis, Okla.): A sign that hung in one mountain cabin warned visitors, “If you’re smoking, you better be on fire.”

High costs for inmate phone calls questioned:Hefty commissions charged on prisoners’ collect calls pump more than $1.5 million annually into the state Corrections Department, records show.

Racial tensions compound tragedy (reporting from Wynnewood, Okla.): High school football player’s death may have opened door for hatred.

1999

Winners & Losers: School choice in Oklahoma: An investigative series based on a computer-assisted reporting project and two months of school visits and interviews.

‘They were in the house that’s gone’: Victims flood hospitals after killer tornadoes in Oklahoma City area.

Young throng revs spirits to greet pope (reporting from St. Louis): Arm-waving, hip-shaking crowd of 20,000 welcomes John Paul II. Other coverage.

Violence: Who’s to blame?: In the wake of a seeming epidemic of school shootings, society looks at media, entertainment sources.

Chartering new territory: Choice school scandals worry educators.

1998

Colorado residents mixed on charter schools (reporting from Castle Rock, Colo.): Experience there offer lessons for Oklahoma.

Sources: Schools chief fighting to keep his job: At least three board members oppose extending his time with the Oklahoma City district, several central-office administrators and sources close to the board say.

• Test exemptions hide flunking schools, critics claim: Roughly three out of 10 Oklahoma City students exempted from high-stakes standardized testing, records show.

Bus rides’ integration role nearly over: After a quarter-century, Oklahoma City slams the brakes on the last vestige of court-ordered desegregation.

DHS investigator battles to keep day care safe: High caseloads make fulfilling state inspection requirements difficult, state records show.

1997

A tale of three cities: Little Rock, Ark., Oklahoma City and Topeka, Kan., were desegregation battlegrounds.

Dying to be thin: Husband, children struggle with loss of anorexic mom.

Elvis Presley (reporting from Memphis, Tenn.): Faithful hordes still swarm the King’s castle 20 years after his death.

• Priest who killed himself carried unknown burdens: The Rev. Edward Joseph Moras’ spirituality and simplicity touched parishioners, but he was unraveling inside.

1996

• 8-year-old’s death rattles Oklahoma (reporting from Little Axe, Okla.): The broken system that failed to protect Shane Alan Coffman pushes child abuse to the front of the state’s collective conscience.

Tears, prayers, bells, headlights offer tributes: Coverage of first anniversary of Oklahoma City bombing.

Enthusiastic crowd greets president (reporting from Edmond, Okla.): In Oklahoma to commemorate the first anniversary of the federal building bombing, Clinton touts anti-terrorism legislation as he addresses thousands.

Wounds to community’s soul may be slowest to heal (reporting from Edmond, Okla.): Ten years ago, Edmond’s name became synonymous with a tragic event — seemingly forever linked with the post office rampage that left 15 dead. With sidebar.

Uncle Sam repays state taxpayers: Federal government sends $1.10 worth of bacon for every $1 worth of pork Oklahoma contributes, records show. Related story.

Busing still provokes emotions: Many seek end to crosstown schools.

1995

Oklahoma City bombing coverage

Neighbor cares for boys when mom doesn’t return: The children had clung to hope that Army recruiter Lola Renee Bolden, a 40-year-old single parent, survived the bombing. She did not.

Somber vigil taking toll on families: For a third straight day, family members of Rick L. Tomlin and scores of other missing bomb victims maintain an excruciatingly familiar routine: wait and hope.

Child’s ready smile, affection remembered: Upon arrival at the federal building daycare that tragic morning, 15-month-old Danielle Nicole Bell opened her eyes and leaned her head against her mother’s chest.

‘It just makes you scared’: A week ago, thunder meant thunder. Today, for Oklahoma City schoolchildren, thunder sounds like a bomb.

Injured fight to rebuild after bombing: Those fortunate enough to survive begin the difficult task of rebuilding their lives.

Compassion, closure draw record crowd: With rescue efforts over and the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building’s remains soon to be demolished, visitors view a somber piece of history.

Sightseers still drawn to bomb site: They come with cameras, pain and respect. They’ve seen it a thousand times in the news, but still they come to see it in person.

Six miracle children reunite: Youngest bomb victims attend Christmas party.

1994

Road to justice: Behind the scenes of a high-profile, double-murder case unlike any in Oklahoma history.

Serial killer Dahmer slain in prison: Mass murderer found peace, Oklahoma minister says.

Number of elections questioned: The way some Oklahoma voters see it, the ballot box should come equipped with a revolving door.

1993

Although rare, Edmond killers attention-getters: The extraordinary nature of recent homicides puts community in the spotlight.

Taxpayers foot bill for Edmond council: Officials contend it’s the opportunity for training, not tourism, that attracts them to the friendly skies.

Nightmare comes true for parents: Daughter killed by speeding driver who had just left a bar.

Edmond police chief quits; severance package questioned: My first story for The Oklahoman makes Page 1 above the fold.

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